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Pairings

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What wine to drink with curry - my top 5 picks

What wine to drink with curry - my top 5 picks

If you’re wondering which wine to pair with curry, you’re not alone. There are probably more opinions about the matter than there are types of curry from “wine is never a good idea* to *any wine you like*.

There are three things I’d bear in mind:

* How hot the curry is. Clearly it’s easier to match wine with a mild curry than a searingly hot one.

* How many other dishes you’re serving and how hot they are. It’s easier, in other words, to think about a wine that will go with the whole meal rather than one element of it.

* and what type of curry you’re talking about - Thai and Malay curries, for example are different from Indian curries with their warmer spices. And home-made curries tend to be hotter and pokier than shop-bought ones or ones made from a bought curry sauce.

What you need with curry - and this is why cold lager and lassi work so well - is a refreshing contrast to the heat of the food. A touch of sweetness helps, particularly with hotter curries and green curries as does a fresh, palate-cleansing acidity.

What doesn’t work so well - in my opinion at least - is tannin and high alcohol which can emphasise and unbalance the spice in a curry. So although ripe fruity reds can work - especially with meaty curries like rogan josh - you don’t really want a 15% oaky monster.

It’s also worth bearing in mind that many Indian restaurants don’t have brilliant wine lists so it’s a question of what will work best rather than what’s ideal. Here are 5 good all-rounders that I think do the job.

A fruity rosé

This style of wine has consistently come out best in the tastings I’ve done for the What Food, What Wine? competition over the past couple of years. Make it a strong fruity style, not a wimpy one though so think Spain, Portugal or South America rather than Provence.

Off-dry riesling

Certainly with chicken, fish and vegetable curries, if not with very meaty ones or ones with a powerful tomato sauce. German, Austrian, Australian and New Zealand rieslings would all do the trick.

Pinot gris

This speciality of Alsace - also found in New Zealand and Oregon - has a particular affinity with Thai green curries but pairs well with mild to medium-hot Indian curries too

Other aromatic whites

Such as fragrant Hungarian whites (the Spice Trail white is good), dry Muscat, Sylvaner/Silvaner and Torrontes from Argentina

Chardonnay

Yes, chardonnay! Particularly fruity styles or blends with grapes such as semillon, chenin and colombard. Good with mild, creamy or buttery curries, especially with chicken. (Viognier is good with this sort of curry too.)

And if I were to pick a red . . .?

I’ll probably go for a juicy, fruity but not too oaky Shiraz or a Chilean Carmenère (similar to a Merlot which would also work well). Pinotage is surprisingly good match with hotter curries and rioja crianza or reserva for rogan josh.

Incidentally you may find Gewurztraminer an odd omission from my top 5 as it’s often paired with curry but it can easily overpower milder curries. Great with a spicy duck curry though.

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Comments: 6 (Add)

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Chloe Monamy on January 12 2017 at 12:31

Spicy Goat Curry (Matt Moran recipe) paired amazing with an aged Gossett Riesling (2012) ... amazing...

Hugh on November 14 2016 at 17:59

How, in your opinion, would a New World style Sauvignon Blanc pair?
These generally have good acidity and a touch of sweetness.

I agree with you on the Pinotage, especially if it is a meaty hot curry.

Charlie on October 13 2016 at 19:47

I've had a Malborough Syrah that had smooth ripe tannins which paired beautifully with a tomato based curry a top Soho Indian.

Jim Oremland on October 16 2015 at 16:23

One that I find works quite well is Vinho Verde. The slight fizz does a terrific job of cleansing the palate between bites.

Ewan Murray on October 14 2014 at 08:50

Manasté, not Manasée! Sorry.

Ewan Murray on October 14 2014 at 08:49

Interesting you mention the omission of gewurztraminer. I organised an Alsace wine dinner at Café Spice Manasée, and before we started discussing the wines and suitable food matches Cyrus said "No gewurztraminer!". He said it didn't have the necessary acidity and freshness to go with his cooking. He did grudgingly (with a smile) allow us to have a VT with dessert!

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